FUN SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS


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  • Balancing Eggs-periment

Balance an egg on its end with some skillful coordination, a little salt—and maybe even a little help from the sun's gravitational pull!
Check it Out
Check it Out

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  • ||
    Illustration: a boy looking at an egg in hot water
    Illustration: a boy looking at an egg in hot water
    ||
    || Illustration: a boy looking at an egg in hot water ||

Bottled Eggs-periment

Amaze your friends by squishing a hard-boiled egg into a bottle! ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: hand spinning an egg
    Illustration: hand spinning an egg
    ||
    || Illustration: hand spinning an egg ||

Spinning Eggs-periment

Take a turn experimenting with the spin cycle of a hard-boiled egg versus a raw one. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: finger squishing an egg next to a bottle of vinger; text reads "Eggs-Periments"
    Illustration: finger squishing an egg next to a bottle of vinger; text reads "Eggs-Periments"
    ||
    || Illustration: finger squishing an egg next to a bottle of vinger; text reads "Eggs-Periments" ||

Squishy Eggs-periment

Turn the humble egg into an all-spinning, all-balancing plaything with these crazy eggs-periments. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: a girl shining a flashlight through a glass of water
    Illustration: a girl shining a flashlight through a glass of water
    ||
    || Illustration: a girl shining a flashlight through a glass of water ||

National Geographic Kids: Experiment With Water Tricks

Make a splash with our reservoir of water tricks! ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: hand holding magnet and small kite
    Illustration: hand holding magnet and small kite
    ||
    || Illustration: hand holding magnet and small kite ||

Magnetic Pick Up

Here's a fun and easy way to fly a kite. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: a child holding a comb by a water faucet
    Illustration: a child holding a comb by a water faucet
    ||
    || Illustration: a child holding a comb by a water faucet ||

All Charged Up

All objects—even you—are made of tiny particles called atoms. These atoms interact and create a charge that has some surprising results. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: a jar containing a plastic frog; "Create a Motion Ocean" text
    Illustration: a jar containing a plastic frog; "Create a Motion Ocean" text
    ||
    || Illustration: a jar containing a plastic frog; "Create a Motion Ocean" text ||

Create a Motion Ocean

Common household items create a dazzling decoration for your room. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: lava lamp; text reads "Make a Groovy Lava Lamp"
    Illustration: lava lamp; text reads "Make a Groovy Lava Lamp"
    ||
    || Illustration: lava lamp; text reads "Make a Groovy Lava Lamp" ||

Make a Groovy Lava Lamp

See science at work with simple household ingredients like oil, water, and food coloring. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: a boy blowing across the tops of bottles
    Illustration: a boy blowing across the tops of bottles
    ||
    || Illustration: a boy blowing across the tops of bottles ||

Sounds Great—Bottled Music

Learn about how sound travels. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: a boy with an umbrella and arrows indicating motion
    Illustration: a boy with an umbrella and arrows indicating motion
    ||
    || Illustration: a boy with an umbrella and arrows indicating motion ||

Star Attraction

Try this stellar experiment. ||
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||
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  • ||
    Illustration: a boy looking at two apple slices and a lemon half
    Illustration: a boy looking at two apple slices and a lemon half
    ||
    || Illustration: a boy looking at two apple slices and a lemon half ||

Magic Mixture—Apple Dunk

Try an experiment with chemical changes. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: a boy looking into a kaleidoscope
    Illustration: a boy looking into a kaleidoscope
    ||
    || Illustration: a boy looking into a kaleidoscope ||

Be Dazzled—Make Your Own Kaleidoscope

Try making your own kaleidoscope. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration shows a cartoon boy looking at a glass containing a bubbling rock
    Illustration shows a cartoon boy looking at a glass containing a bubbling rock
    ||
    || Illustration shows a cartoon boy looking at a glass containing a bubbling rock ||

Rock On—Fizzy Fun

Try this experiment with a rock. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out


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More >>
  • ||
    Illustration: hand holding magnet and small kite
    Illustration: hand holding magnet and small kite
    ||
    || Illustration: hand holding magnet and small kite ||

Magnetic Pick Up

Here's a fun and easy way to fly a kite. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: lava lamp; text reads "Make a Groovy Lava Lamp"
    Illustration: lava lamp; text reads "Make a Groovy Lava Lamp"
    ||
    || Illustration: lava lamp; text reads "Make a Groovy Lava Lamp" ||

Make a Groovy Lava Lamp

See science at work with simple household ingredients like oil, water, and food coloring. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: a child holding a comb by a water faucet
    Illustration: a child holding a comb by a water faucet
    ||
    || Illustration: a child holding a comb by a water faucet ||

All Charged Up

All objects—even you—are made of tiny particles called atoms. These atoms interact and create a charge that has some surprising results. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Image: a hand cutting an index card and a boy holding a paper ring around his head
    Image: a hand cutting an index card and a boy holding a paper ring around his head
    ||
    || Image: a hand cutting an index card and a boy holding a paper ring around his head ||

Paper-Cutting Trick

You can bet a friend that you can put your head through a hole in a file card—and win! ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: boy and girl looking at an egg
    Illustration: boy and girl looking at an egg
    ||
    || Illustration: boy and girl looking at an egg ||

Balancing Eggs-periment

Balance an egg on its end with some skillful coordination, a little salt—and maybe even a little help from the sun's gravitational pull! ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

More >>

Most Recent
Most Recent

Most Recent


Top Rated
Top Rated

Top Rated


  • ||
    Illustration: hand holding magnet and small kite
    Illustration: hand holding magnet and small kite
    ||
    || Illustration: hand holding magnet and small kite ||

Magnetic Pick Up

Here's a fun and easy way to fly a kite. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: lava lamp; text reads "Make a Groovy Lava Lamp"
    Illustration: lava lamp; text reads "Make a Groovy Lava Lamp"
    ||
    || Illustration: lava lamp; text reads "Make a Groovy Lava Lamp" ||

Make a Groovy Lava Lamp

See science at work with simple household ingredients like oil, water, and food coloring. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: a child holding a comb by a water faucet
    Illustration: a child holding a comb by a water faucet
    ||
    || Illustration: a child holding a comb by a water faucet ||

All Charged Up

All objects—even you—are made of tiny particles called atoms. These atoms interact and create a charge that has some surprising results. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Image: a hand cutting an index card and a boy holding a paper ring around his head
    Image: a hand cutting an index card and a boy holding a paper ring around his head
    ||
    || Image: a hand cutting an index card and a boy holding a paper ring around his head ||

Paper-Cutting Trick

You can bet a friend that you can put your head through a hole in a file card—and win! ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: boy and girl looking at an egg
    Illustration: boy and girl looking at an egg
    ||
    || Illustration: boy and girl looking at an egg ||

Balancing Eggs-periment

Balance an egg on its end with some skillful coordination, a little salt—and maybe even a little help from the sun's gravitational pull! ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: a boy looking into a kaleidoscope
    Illustration: a boy looking into a kaleidoscope
    ||
    || Illustration: a boy looking into a kaleidoscope ||

Be Dazzled—Make Your Own Kaleidoscope

Try making your own kaleidoscope. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: a boy looking at an egg in hot water
    Illustration: a boy looking at an egg in hot water
    ||
    || Illustration: a boy looking at an egg in hot water ||

Bottled Eggs-periment

Amaze your friends by squishing a hard-boiled egg into a bottle! ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: a jar containing a plastic frog; "Create a Motion Ocean" text
    Illustration: a jar containing a plastic frog; "Create a Motion Ocean" text
    ||
    || Illustration: a jar containing a plastic frog; "Create a Motion Ocean" text ||

Create a Motion Ocean

Common household items create a dazzling decoration for your room. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration shows a globe featuring Antarctica covered by a large patch representing the ozone hole
    Illustration shows a globe featuring Antarctica covered by a large patch representing the ozone hole
    ||
    || Illustration shows a globe featuring Antarctica covered by a large patch representing the ozone hole ||

Living in a Green World

Take small steps that make a big difference to the health of the planet. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: a boy looking at two apple slices and a lemon half
    Illustration: a boy looking at two apple slices and a lemon half
    ||
    || Illustration: a boy looking at two apple slices and a lemon half ||

Magic Mixture—Apple Dunk

Try an experiment with chemical changes. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: a girl shining a flashlight through a glass of water
    Illustration: a girl shining a flashlight through a glass of water
    ||
    || Illustration: a girl shining a flashlight through a glass of water ||

National Geographic Kids: Experiment With Water Tricks

Make a splash with our reservoir of water tricks! ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration shows a cartoon boy looking at a glass containing a bubbling rock
    Illustration shows a cartoon boy looking at a glass containing a bubbling rock
    ||
    || Illustration shows a cartoon boy looking at a glass containing a bubbling rock ||

Rock On—Fizzy Fun

Try this experiment with a rock. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: a boy blowing across the tops of bottles
    Illustration: a boy blowing across the tops of bottles
    ||
    || Illustration: a boy blowing across the tops of bottles ||

Sounds Great—Bottled Music

Learn about how sound travels. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: hand spinning an egg
    Illustration: hand spinning an egg
    ||
    || Illustration: hand spinning an egg ||

Spinning Eggs-periment

Take a turn experimenting with the spin cycle of a hard-boiled egg versus a raw one. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: finger squishing an egg next to a bottle of vinger; text reads "Eggs-Periments"
    Illustration: finger squishing an egg next to a bottle of vinger; text reads "Eggs-Periments"
    ||
    || Illustration: finger squishing an egg next to a bottle of vinger; text reads "Eggs-Periments" ||

Squishy Eggs-periment

Turn the humble egg into an all-spinning, all-balancing plaything with these crazy eggs-periments. ||
Check it Out
Check it Out
||
Check it Out

  • ||
    Illustration: a boy with an umbrella and arrows indicating motion
    Illustration: a boy with an umbrella and arrows indicating motion
    ||
    || Illustration: a boy with an umbrella and arrows indicating motion ||

Star Attraction

  • Up, Up and Away with Bottles

> Up, Up and Away with Bottles
>
If there is a force pushing in one direction, there is an equal force pushing in the opposite direction.
This is what Isaac Newton said around 300 years ago. The rocket age is very modern, but the science which explains how rockets work was understood hundreds of years ago. Rockets burn in a fuel chamber shaped like a bottle with a neck pointing down. The burning fuel produces large amounts of gases expanded by heat. The gases are forced down through the neck at high speed, forcing the rocket up in the opposite direction.
This fun activity explores this scientific principle using plastic bottles to make water rockets. Choose a large open area outside for this activity.

You will need

    • plastic PET bottle
    • bicycle pump
    • water
    • rubber stopper to firmly fit inside the neck of the bottle
    • inflating nozzle like those used for inflating basketballs
    • cardboard carton with hole to support neck of bottle

What to do

PET Rocket
PET Rocket

PET Rocket

With an adult to help, drill a hole in the rubber stopper to fit the inflating nozzle. Attach the nozzle to the pump. Fit the stopper and nozzle firmly into the neck of the bottle. Place the bottle upside down on the cardboard carton - your launch pad! Pump air into the bottle until the air pressure inside forces the stopper out of the bottom. What happens to the bottle?
Try it again, but this time put some water into the bottle before fitting the stopper. Pump air into the bottle until the air pressure forces the stopper out of the bottom. This time, water and air are forced down through the neck. This causes a force pushing the bottle up. How high did the water rocket go?
Try different amounts of water. What is the best amount of water to make the rocket go high?
Design fins for your water rocket. Do they improve the flight of the rocket?
CAUTION: Do not make any point at the top of the rocket — this could be dangerous.
From: Fun 'n' Science Activity Book, published by Questacon – The National Science and Technology Centre.

Musical Coathanger



You will need

  • wire coathanger
  • cotton thread

What to do

Musical Coathanger
Musical Coathanger

Musical Coathanger

Tie a 50 cm length of cotton thread on each end of a wire coathanger. Wrap the other end of each thread around your forefingers. Bend over so the coathanger can swing freely and bump it against a wall or chair.

What do you hear?

Try it again, but this time with your forefingers in your ears! Try bumping it against different objects. Bend the coathanger into various shapes. Does this make any difference to the sound you hear?
When you bump the coathanger, it shakes or vibrates, making a noise. The noise is louder when your fingers are in your ears because the vibrations travel better through the tight cotton threads than through the air.
Next time you're in the bath, put one ear under the water while tapping a spoon on the side of the bath. Notice how much better the tapping noise travels through the water.
From: Science Toys and Activities, published by Questacon – The National Science and Technology Centre.

Salt, soil and seeds



You will need

  • 2 cups
  • cotton wool
  • 10 wheat seeds
  • salt

What to do

Salt being added to cup
Salt being added to cup

Salt being added to cup

Cover the bottom of two cups with cotton wool.
Sprinkle some salt over the bottom of one cup. Label this cup “salt added”.
Place five wheat seeds in each cup. It helps if you place the seeds with their grooved side upwards.
Wet the cotton wool in both cups and put in a light place. Keep the seeds moist — you could cover the cups with clear plastic wrap to prevent the seeds from drying out.
Within four or five days, the seeds should begin to grow. Which seeds begin to grow first — the seeds with or without salt?
Observe the seeds growing for a few more days.
What difference do you see?
Plant shoots
Plant shoots

Plant shoots

Think about it

The increasing amount of salt in the soil (salination) is one of Australia's biggest environmental problems. In 1990, 50 000 km2 of land were affected by salinity. This area is almost the same as the whole state of Tasmania!
Salts occur naturally in the soil and are carried by water. If the underground water level is close to the surface, the soil becomes too salty for many plants to grow. Tree planting programs can help reduce this problem. So too can the planting of crops which grow well in salty soils (salt tolerant).

Explore more

Experiment with different amounts of salt to find out how much will stop wheat from growing.
Try putting salt on the wheat seeds after they have sprouted. Try growing different types of seeds.
Which plants will grow in salty soil?

Pepper Scatter



Don't sneeze!

You will need

  • tray, plate or dish
  • pepper
  • soap
  • liquid detergent

What to do

Soap being touched onto surface of water
Soap being touched onto surface of water

Soap being touched onto surface of water

Put some water into a clean tray, plate or dish. Sprinkle some pepper on top of the water. With a cake of soap, touch the water. What happens to the pepper? What happens when you take the soap away?
Rinse the tray thoroughly to remove traces of soap. Put some water into the tray and sprinkle some pepper on top. Place a drop of detergent on the water.
What happens to the pepper?

Think about it

Surface tension on water makes a strong 'skin' which is tight and not very elastic. The pepper stays on the water until soap or detergent touches the skin. Soap and detergent reduce the attractive forces between water molecules — that is, they reduce surface tension. The skin stretches, scattering the pepper.

Explore more

Use a toothpick dipped in detergent to touch a water drop resting on waxed paper.
What happens? ||